Saturday, January 1, 2011

Happy New Year - 1/1/11 !!!

As the sun peeks over the ridge on the first day of 2011, I hope you have your black-eyed peas and hog jowl for good luck, as well as collard greens to put money in your pockets. . . or that you have the necessary accouterments for whatever tradition you follow -- be it first footers, Christmas tree bonfires, picnics on the beach, fireworks . . .

May it be a good New Year for all of us on Spaceship Earth!!!


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26 comments:

RNSANE said...

Southern belle that I am ( though I've been in the San Francisco area for 34 years ), I'm good to go. The blackeyed peas are soaking, I got the best looking ham hocks and my collards are waiting to cook tomorrow. I don't dare tempt the fates. My 2010 wasn't so great.

Best wishes for all that is good in 2011.

Marilyn said...

Some of the things you mention to have ready sound so interesting and foreign to me.
As I write this it is 8.43pm on the 1st, our day is nearly done, the sun is going down.
I wish you and your family and friends health and happiness, love and laughter and also wish you great success with your new book.

Martin H. said...

Maybe it's the 1/1/11, but something feels extra fresh about this year.

Elora said...

Here, here, Vicki! Looking forward to this chapter! Best of everything to you!

Elora

Rainsong said...

Your picture of ingredients is beautiful. What is the story behind the board?
Day has not yet dawned on the Pacific Coast.

Deborah...who has never had a black eye pea, hog jowl or collards (though I did try to grow them last year, they did not seem to feel at home in the PNW, poor things)

June said...

With your New Year's Day talismans ready to go, you hardly need it, but here's my wish for a happy new year anyway. :-p

I ate black-eyed peas once. :-'

Brian Miller said...

happy new year vicki...hoping you are blessed in the next 365...

KarenB said...

I have just heard of a tradition of eating sauerkraut on New Year's Day. Neither person could explain why and it is a tradition I had never heard of before. One of them went on to explain that you eat chicken on New Year's Eve because chickens scratch backwards and pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day because pigs root forward.

Happy New Year, Vicki. May your year be filled with good friends and good books, and peaceful times for enjoying both.

Vicki Lane said...

You can take the girl out of the South but you can't take the South out of the girl! Good for you, Carmen!

Are there any NZ New Year's traditions, Marilyn?

I agree, Martin! That 1/1/11 feels very much like a new start!

Me too, Elora!

Deborah - My younger son made that cutting board and used a wood burning tool to put that pretty lady on it.

Hmm, June, I detect a serious lack of enthusiasm for the Sacred Legume of the South...

And to you, Brian!

Now that's interesting. Karen! I wonder where that tradition originated. Off to Mr. Google...

Bouncin' Barb said...

Happy New Year to you Vicki...love your post!

Tammy said...

Hope we all have a blessed New Year! I've got the black eyed peas simmering on wood stove, with some bits of ham. Hope that works. No collard greens here, but maybe some salad and definitely a big pan of cornbread.
Tammy

Star said...

I've never eaten black eyed peas. I don't know what a hog jowl is? I've never seen collard greens either? I think I'm missing something here! I consider myself lucky today if nothing goes wrong!
Loved your pictures.
Blessings, Star

Kathryn Magendie said...

Happy New Year to you!

Deanna said...

Oh dear, does that mean I'm doomed to have bad luck? I didn't follow any of those traditions!

The best to you and yours in 2011!

Kath said...

Thank you, and the very best of New Years to you.

Merisi said...

Happy New Year, Vicki, to you and your loved ones!

Back in Italy, they eat a special lentil soup on New Year's Day, served with a slice of two of Cotechino, a very tasty concoction made from coarsely ground pork, with an incredibly fragrant and eclectic mix of spices, from cinnamon to nutmeg and vanilla, among more savory ones. The way I remember it, the ground pork mixtures was filled into a pig-skin encasing, sewn together to look like a pig's food. It took a couple of hours to cook. Nowadays, it seems to be sold in a more sanitized version, made to look like a fat sausage, vacuum-packed and already cooked. When properly cooked it takes on a pleasant gelatinous quality, and tastes incredibly good with the lentils (which in my memory looked more like a stew than soup). Wished I had a bowlful right now!

Austrians seems to also believe that eating pork on New Year's day augurs good luck. We had steak. Oopsie! ;-)

Friko said...

Prost Neujahr, Vicki!

Canyon Girl said...

I just learned from another blog about the blackeyed pea tradition and that it stemmed from the civil war. This is one reason I love to blog and read blogs...you learn so much and it is so enjoyable. Happy New Year!--Inger

dana said...

We have boiled cabbage with a penny in it. Whoever gets the penny has a prosperous year. Some people use nickels or quarters. Sounds kind of filthy in this day and age. Some people use saurkraut. I think it's interesting to hear the different traditions.

Brenda said...

Eeeek... I don't think hog jowl would bring me good luck. But I swear by the black eyed peas and collards. So much so that because my "official" New Year's dinner got postponed a day, I had to eat a bite of raw collard (VERY bitter), and a spoonful of cold blackeyed peas.

This was one of those days when it was just as interesting to read the comments as the post. Don't know any interesting New Year's traditions, but last night at a New Year's Eve party, neighbors were telling us about the "Christmas pickle." Have you ever heard of that one? Apparently, it's German, and whichever child finds the Christmas pickle hidden in the tree gets a prize. I thought that was great, it's one I've never heard of before!

Miss_Yves said...

Happy new year!

www.les-botaniques-du-val-douve.com/2717-18-val-douve-c-malus-diable-rouge-plante-a-baies-attractives.html

vicki lane: now, I konw the answer about the berries: "malus diable rouge"

Reader Wil said...

I wish you too a very Happy New Year, Vicki! Thanks for your friendship and always nice comments.
I had two young couples from Poland. They were all students, but one. all week we went to church with the guests from Taizé to attend a service at 8.30 then we had a meeting in smaller groups and we discussed several subjects like: trust, joy, compassion, forgiving...Then we had coffee and after that the guests went to Rotterdam to meet the other young people.There were 30,000 young people from various countries in Europe. They had lunch in Rotterdam and a hot meal and came back at 9 pm.They left on New Year's Day. We were all sad about to say goodbye..
This afternoon I will meet two Greek bloggers with their families.They will come here at 4 pm. Great, I am looking forward to meeting them!

Crafty Green Poet said...

Happy New Year! Our New Year tradition is a dram of whisky and a piece of shortbread as the fireworks flare across the sky

NCmountainwoman said...

Happy New Year!!!

We've done all the wrong things...tree still up, no black-eyed peas, no hog jowl, no collards. And yet we dare hope for a good year.

Vicki Lane said...

Hog jowls are pig cheeks and look and taste like streaky bacon, Star.

Cotechino sound great, Merisi! I love finding out about these other New Year traditions.

Lots of folks evidently include cabbage or sauerkraut, Dana.

I've heard about the pickle on the Christmas tree, Brenda, but it wasn't part of our tradition.

I'm guessing that's what we call a crab apple, Miss Yves.

Wil, it sounds as if you're in a whirlwind of visitors! What fun!

CGPoet -- My husband would join you in a dram of single malt -- I'll have some of that shortbread and a glass of bubbly.


Mountainwoman --Traditions and superstitions should be like religion -- you choose whether or not to follow. I'm sure your NNew Year will be great!

Merisi said...

Brenda,
I learned about the Christmas pickle (made of German painted glass) from a German friend back in DC, and it is the thirst thing our children look for when the Christmas tree goes up (next come their own First Christmas ornaments).