Saturday, January 9, 2010

Spinning

I don't get out much. So when I heard someone mention that they were taking a spin class, I figured they had an interest in fiber.

But then, the person referred to the gym . . . spin class appeared to be an aerobic workout of some sort. So immediately, I pictured this. How cool would that be, to learn to whirl like a dervish!

Imagine my disappointment. Spinning isn't what I thought. Better call and cancel that class.

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15 comments:

Yolanda V. Fundora said...

I love that! I'm with you. I'd be a dervish any day over a hamster!

Martin H. said...

I've long since found this obsession with 'working out' to be more than an irritation. If people can find the time to wear their joints out in the gym, why can't they take the less expensive option of exploring their surroundings or, if they must, run in the local park, where the ground is kinder and there are no fees to pay?

Seems that 'spinning' is another euphemism for pain, strain and money down the drain!

Merisi said...

That could make one's head spin!!! :-)

The best kind of spinning is to a fast waltz. ;-)

Pat in east TN said...

I guess a person has to really check into what is said anymore ... so many different meanings for a word.

Although I rode a bike up until a few years ago (Bent Creek and the Virginia Creeper), I've retired from that past time now and spinning has never interested me. I need something around me that's interesting and beautiful to take my mind off the pain!

My Carolina Kitchen said...

Cute story Vicki. I would much rather do your idea of spinning than the gym's idea. Come visit us and go to the John Campbell Folk School nearby where they teach the old fashion style spinning.

Stay warm,
Sam

Vicki Lane said...

I almost wish I hadn't found the truth. It didn't seem so far-fetched; after all, there are classes in belly dancing and any number of exotic thing . . .

A fast waltz -- the Viennese aerobic spinning -- there's a nice idea.

Tipper said...

I've heard of the spinning classes too. I think I'd enjoy the first photo you shared the most :)

Miss_Yves said...

Very funny !
"Spinning class"...Aerobic and so on :it's too hard for me !but when I was young, I followed the fashion of aerobic .
Now, I 'm only fond of Yoga or aqua gym .

Star said...

Oh I would have been disappointed too! I would love to learn to spin. I really would. It is an ambition of mine to get a spinning wheel and learn to spin yarn. However, I am getting older and if I don't soon do it, it will be too late, won't it!
Love the picture of the dancers.
Blessings, Star

Vicki Lane said...

I once had visions of learning to weave but found it too tedious. I'm afraid I'd feel the same about spinning -- fiber or exercise wheels. I remember how much fun it was as a child to whirl around and around till you were dizzy-drunk and fell down.

The dervishes must use some Sufi powers to stay upright -- or the spinning ballerina's trick of keeping one's eye fixed on a spot as long as possible.

Vagabonde said...

That is a funny post. I like it because it shows that I am not the only one not always understanding the English language – if you, a writer, can be mislead by the vocabulary, then I see why I can make mistakes too. I think if I had heard of a spinning class, I would have thought it was a craft class. For Christmas I wanted to purchase a toy for my grandson which in French we call “toupie” it is made of wood, cylindrical, and you whirl it on its point, and it spins around. My husband said that it was a spin, or a top I think. So a spin class – a toy making class, non?

Kathryn Stripling Byer said...

I've always thought of writing a poem as being somewhat like spinning, the old-fashioned kind, whether mountain woman twining fibers together or Sufi dancing to show the union of the four quarters and the earth below, the heavens above. I love the joining of fingers and feet in this image, so that's how I choose to view the art of poetry.

Vicki Lane said...

Oh, Vagabonde -- my ignorance is vast, even in my own language. But the Internet and my friend Mr. Google are there to help me find the answer.

As for French -- I follow Miss Yves blog PHOTOGRAFF and keep an English-French dictionary at my side in order to puzzle out the briefer posts. You folks who have several languages at your command have my deepest admiration!

Spinning is such a powerful image, Kay-- think of the Moirae, the Greek Fates who spun the thread of a man's life. And prayer wheels and who knows what all?

Tammy said...

I would like to learn to spin--the fiber variety. As one who works with an entire generation of younger folks (less a few of us 'oldies') many things don't make it past the language barrier. :-) When I said I wanted to learn to spin I got odd looks from my gym guru coworkers.
Tammy

Vicki Lane said...

I'm kind of surprised you haven't already learned, Tammy, what with all the raw material you have on hand -- still, just getting the fleece into spinnable condition is time consuming -- and you're working hard enough seems to me!