Monday, October 8, 2012

Harry and Thelma

 
 
 
 
 
 
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11 comments:

Novice Naturalist said...

Looks like a cold winter coming, if the elders in Rabun County are right--broad bands on the wooly worms mean BRRRR cold cold winter. We'll see. I just hope we have at least one big snow here this year. Nothing at my elevation last year.

Martin said...

What do these little charmers eventually blossom into, Vicki?

Ms. A said...

You always rock these captioned photos!

Brian Miller said...

sometimes i dont know if i am coming or going....ha...this was fun vicki...thanks for the monday chuckles...

Terri Buster said...

Shake a leg, or two or three...too funny!

Jean Baardsen said...

Cute! Enjoyed this. I couldn't tell which end was the head either....

June said...

I've seen only three or four woolly bears this fall, and had to look up (in the Farmers Almanac, of course) what it meant that their front brown parts and middle black parts are equal. On all of them!
I suppose it means winter will be cold with a very very good chance of snow, ice, sleet, and freezing rain.

Vicki Lane said...

Martin, wooly worms turn into Isabella Tiger Moths (not especially exciting looking.) But the neat thing about wooly worms -- aside from the fact that some folks say the width of the bands predict the coming winter will be -- the neat thing is that they don't turn into moths right away if they haven't had adequate food (they are also found in the Arctic). They can survive as caterpillars as long as 14 winters and they freeze solid and come back.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrrharctia_isabella

NCmountainwoman said...

I'm going to believe that there is a "lot" of brown so the winter will be short and mild.

Very cute post.

Friko said...

A novel in the making . . . .

jennyfreckles said...

Ha, you're so good at these. I never know whether they're coming or going either.