Sunday, September 19, 2010

ROOM

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Many, many thanks to all of you faithful readers who followed me over to Poe's Deadly Daughters and left comments yesterday. And what great comments they were! You all are the best! I'll be drawing for the winner of the signed DAY OF SMALL THINGS sometime after seven AM EST on Monday (so there's still time to comment over there if you haven't) and will post the winner's name here on this blog on Tuesday. And now, to today's post...
As many of you know, my reading has been limited recently to mysteries I can't talk about.  But an interview on the radio the other day piqued my curiosity and when I saw a copy of ROOM while I was shopping last Tuesday, well, I didn't hesitate.

I started reading it while waiting for my writing class to begin; I nibbled at it during the fifteen minutes they were doing in class writing; and when I got back home at 9:30 pm, I sat down and read straight through to the end.

That's what kind of book this is.

ROOM is the story of Jack and his mother, prisoners in an 11 by 11 room in a back yard shed. Jack is five -- he was born there, sired by his mother's captor -- and it's through his words the tale is told, through his eyes, we see the world.

I know; it sounds grim. But the thing is -- it's not. Jack is happy in the only world he's ever known, thanks to his mother's splendid capacity for inventiveness.

This anazing novel has much to say about human nature and the human condition and the mother-child relationship. Donoghue's depiction of how Jack responds to his small, familiar world and the massive adjustment needed when at last he and his mother escape to the larger world is masterful.

But don't take my word for it. There's a good review HERE 

Oh, and ROOM is short listed for the prestigious Booker Prize.

Can you tell I liked this book?

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12 comments:

FOLKWAYS NOTEBOOK said...

Nice to have a book recommendation by one who is a writer. -- barbara

Marilyn said...

This book sounds as though it would so grim but you have piqued my curiosity.

Joan said...

The book sounds strange fiction but there have been those instances in real life. You make it sound very interesting. You are such a busy person Vicki! Writing, teaching.. and blogging. I so appreciate you visiting me!

Martin H. said...

My 'to read' list grows ever longer. Thanks for flagging this one up, though. It sounds like a must.

Pat in east TN said...

I went to Amazon and read the reviews ... sounds outstanding, + I love recommendations from friends who love to read as much as I do. This will be my next read when I finish the book I'm reading now. Thanks Vicki!

Vicki Lane said...

This book is so NOT grim! Jack's voice is amazing and compelling. While he's a very bright five year-old in a terrible situation, it's the only life he's known. The author has done a wonderful job imagining what his perceptions would be.

Brian Miller said...

nice. going to go check it out and maybe put it on the short list...

PattyF said...

Sounds intriguing. Thanks for the recommendation. It's now officially on my "To Read" list!

NCmountainwoman said...

What better recommendation than that a book kept you up all night! I'm always fascinated when I read about people who seem to live happily in such dire and abysmal circumstances. And your point is well made. It's because they have never known anything else.

Ms EM said...

Based on this post, I've added this to my wish list on GoodReads and told the girls at http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/26915.Coffee_Talk

Great on-line club and several of us are meeting in Memphis next month! You should join us!

Vicki Lane said...

Brian --I would think you'd like this, judging from things you've posted. It's a serious tour de force.

Really, I don't know who wouldn't like it -- it's completely compelling.

Ms.EM -- I'd love to meet up with you all but Memphis is a long ways away for me.

Victoria said...

Sounds really interesting, thanks for the recommendation!