Sunday, August 1, 2010

Threshing

What a great way to spend a Saturday morning . . . at a threshing demonstration!
It'a probably been a good half century since folks here grew wheat  for home use but a few dedicated souls like to keep the tradition alive -- and the old machines in working order.

It was a wonderful glimpse at the past-- and a nice way to meet more of the county.


Here's a slide show with captions that will explain what's going on . . . click on picture to biggify.


 And here's a brief video . . .

 

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21 comments:

Bernie said...

I would love to spend a Saturday Thresing, sounds like my kind of day......:-) Hugs

tattytiara said...

I have attended many such events with the pleasure of an expert in historical farm machinery for company. My boyfriend's an industrial mechanic by trade, and hobby farms largely as an excuse to own a tractor. Those old machines really are a lesson in perspective, and as your lovely photos illustrate often a wonderful study in design as well.

Martin H. said...

Marvellous! The dust, the noise and no health & safety official in sight. Love the way that gentleman is stood astride the drive belt. Now that is living dangerously!

Mr. Stupid said...

That's really cool. I would love to work on that thing sometime. Thanks for sharing the video...:)

Friko said...

It is good that some of the old customs are kept alive that way; round here in the depth of rural England many traditions are preserved by enthusiasts, purely as reminders though.
I like the modern , easy way, too, the old ways would hardly feed all of us.

June Calender said...

I feel a century old -- I remember threshing machines! Before I was 10 some local farmer had a threshing machine and went from farm to farm with it. It looked like your picture and so did the overall wearing farmers [I imagine they were dirtier]. Thanks for the pix and memories.

Brian Miller said...

how very cool. we took the boys to touch-a-truck where all the big trucks in the city are on display from trashtrucks to cranes to...you name it...there were hundreds of trucks...lots of fun...great pics....

gayle said...

This is something we would have loved to see!

My Carolina Kitchen said...

How interesting. Isn't it wonderful people keep this old traditions alive. It's such fun to live in the mountains, isn't it?
Sam

Carol@ Writers Porch/ Book House said...

I love these old time demonstrations!
I know I was born 100 years too late to suit me! :)

Mildred said...

What a wonderful day. The photos are just great.

Star said...

The threshing machine makes light work of it doesn't it. I love to watch men doing men's work, don't you! and this post is perfect for Lammas.
So congratulations for Lammas and Blessings from Star.

jennyfreckles said...

That's very interesting - how marvellous that they keep these old traditions alive and, as you say, what a lovely way for the community to get together. There is a lot of beauty in those old machines.

Vicki Lane said...

Fortunately the weather cooperated by being cooler -- and the rain held off till afternoon.

Tatty -- I'll bet there are a whole lot of men who'd really like to own a tractor. We have a tractor so what my guys dream of is a track-hoe.

Yeah, Marvin -- it looks a little risky to me.

Right, Friko -- it would take a very long time to produce enough wheat to keep a family in 'light bread' (wheat bread, as opposed to corn (maize) bread) for a year.

Around here, this thresher was still traveling to other farms fifty or sixty years ago. Several of the fellas there remembered helping with the threshing in their youth.

Brian -- Touch a Truck sounds like a marvelous event for kids!

You got that right, Sam!

Men are strange and wonderful creatures, Star -- a whole different breed of cat. Happy Lammas!

Star said...

Your post today was so interesting and informative that I went in search of something similar for my other Blog, http://awitchabroad.blogspot.com because your post reminded me of the series we have had recently over here, called The Victoria Farm. If you have the time and feel inclined, have a peek at the little film I've put out for viewing, because it shows how the wheat was cut in days gone by and the spiritual connections in the stooks left behind.
Blessings, Star

NCmountainwoman said...

You always seem to bring back wonderful memories. As I child, I was always excited when the thresher came to Grandpa's farm. What a treat it was.

Vicki Lane said...

Marvin! Where did that come from? Forgive me, MaRtin!

I checked out the video on your other blog, Star -- fascinating!

When would that have been, NCmountainwoman? I'm wondering how recently folks were still growng wheat for home use.

willow said...

This is so cool. My grandfather told me all about working on the threshing team when he was a teenager, back in the 1920s in rural Indiana.

Vagabonde said...

That was very interesting Vicki. I did not know the name, had never seen the machine and had never heard of it –so that was also very educative. It must have been a fun day – I would have loved to watch.

NCmountainwoman said...

I started school in 1950, so the "thrashing" as I called it would have been in the late 40s. I don't remember threshing after I started school. But I DO remember the delightful days of making molasses, complete with a mule and turnstyle. Oh, and the chilly, exciting, all-day hog killing time.

Tipper said...

What a wonderful thing to see-makes me wish I was there. Neat video.