Saturday, December 8, 2012

The Invention of Hugo Cabret


This big beauty arrived at our house a few days with no card to tell us who'd sent it. Various folks have told me I'd like the book and, oh yes, I do!  A wonderful, quirky story (not nearly as long as it looks) enlivened by beautiful pencil drawings that are used to advance the story in cinematographic fashion. 

(Go HERE for a slide show that illustrates the technique.)

Hugo Cabret is a  mechanical wizard, living hidden behind the clocks in a bustling Paris train station. Every day is a struggle to survive and then he discovers an intriguing automaton -- a figure poised to write a message and his life gets even more complicated...
 
 Hugo is befriended by a young girl, the ward of an eccentric old shopkeeper. Together, Hugo and the girl begin to piece together the many mysteries that are at the center of this charming story. 

Charming, and wise too. 

“Sometimes I come up here at night...just to look at the city. I like to imagine that the world is one big machine. You know, machines never have any extra parts. They have the exact number and type of parts they need. So I figure if the entire world is a big machine, I have to be here for some reason. And that means you have to be here for some reason, too.” 

 It's a children's book -- don't let that stop you. And of course, it's a movie too -- equally quirky and intriguing.
 
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13 comments:

Ms. A said...

Hmmmm, wonder if my grands have heard of this one?

Martin said...

I'd heard of the film, but the book looks even more intriguing.

Thérèse said...

The movie was quite interesting but I would like to read the book.

Miss_Yves said...

I found the movie wonderful!

Brian Miller said...

it was a fun movie....and def a fun book....

Anonymous said...

Loved the movie. Off the subject, but right now
I 'm reading The End of Your Life Book CLub, probably one of the best books I've ever read
Deana the queena

June said...

It looks like such a beautiful book, and story!

B. Rogers, Alchemy of Clay said...

Hope you're on your way home as I write this...I love that this movie was a book, and the illustrations were also used in the movie...I'll have to read it too now. And I'm definitely ready to see the movie again (loved the cameo roles by some favorite actors). Welcome home! (early wishes)

Vagabonde said...

I’d love to read the book. I saw the Martin Scorsese movie Hugo last year. It brought back Georges Méliès from obscurity, which was nice. He is really the father of special effects in films.
In the movie, the scenes of Paris at night through the train station were fabulous. I thought I recognized some scenes from la Gare du Nord in Paris where I commuted all the time, but the clock toward is more like La Gare de Lyon. The French historian Clive Lamming (born in 1938 – English father and French mother) was heavily involved in the movie to make it historically accurate. He is the best railway historian in Europe and has published many books on the subject. My husband bought me Paris au temps des gares by him, a coffee book – which is on my shelf to be read. I think The Invention of Hugo Cabret is considered a children’s book – but adults should also read enchanted tales, don’t you think?

Darla said...

Glad to read that you are making progress physically, as well as enjoying a delightful book. :-) I saw the movie and enjoyed it ... except the ending. Does the book end the same way?

Inger said...

I didn't see the film but from your description, the book looks very interesting. Children's books are often filled with wisdom and special treats not found in grownup books.

Tammy said...

I am so hoping you are safely ensconced at home by now. I'm sure your feeling rough if you are after the trip, but it will feel so good to be home.

Take care,
Tammy

Miss_Yves said...

http://www.cinematheque.fr/fr/musee-collections/musee/

About Gerges Méliès